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William A. Schreiner, Jr.
Email | 202.778.1858

With a focus on coverage disputes under liability and property insurance contracts, Bill Schreiner represents both insurers and policyholders in coverage disputes of all types.  From counseling insureds about coverage under potential policies to negotiation, litigation, and every type of dispute resolution in between, he has experience handing coverage issues of any stripe.   

Showing 113 posts by William A. Schreiner, Jr..

Can You “Negligently” Fire Someone?

Insurance Claim Form - REJECTEDThe answer to that question, at least according to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, is “no.” 

It seems straightforward, but getting to that “no” requires a little bit of an understanding of insurance – in this case, directors’ and officers’ (“D&O”) insurance.  A D&O policy was at issue in this case, Forest Meadows Owners Assoc. v. State Farm Ins. Co., in which the policyholder – a condominium association – was sued by an employee it had fired, and sought coverage from its insurer.   Read More ›

The Inbox: Mr. Vernon “Expected A Little More From A Varsity Letterman” Edition

It’s been a busy week here at the Suits-by-SuitsGlobal Executive Employment Dispute Centre in Washington, D.C., what with interesting Supreme Court arguments being heard, the famous Cherry Blossoms about to blossom, our beloved Nationals putting final touches on their pitching rotation, and even some more snow from the winter without end. 

But none of that matters next to what’s really important about this week: which is that Monday marked thirty years (!) since the fabled “Breakfast Club” met for detention on a dreary Saturday, March 24, 1984, (at Shermer High School, Shermer, Illinois…).  In celebration of the great teen-angst classic, we’re using quotes from the film to introduce this week's collection of interesting news notes from the world of executive-level employment disputes.  So here they are, framed by the work of the movie’s writer and director, the late, great John HughesRead More ›

Political Intrigue, Sex, And Money

college system troubleWe see – and report on – plenty of whistleblower complaints here at Suits-by-Suits. We’re mostly interested in how those complaints play out legally, and what they can teach us about ways to avoid, or manage, whistleblower disputes and what leads to them.  But outside of the law, some complaints include alleged facts that just tell a compelling story in and of themselves. 

How about these allegations in Glenn Meeks’ wrongful termination complaint against Chicago State University: Financial mismanagement, a romantic relationship between top university executives, high-level posts filled with unqualified personnel, intrigue on the university’s board of trustees after Meeks complained of these things, and – a bonus, from a storytelling perspective – a suspicion of improper interference by the Governor of Illinois in the whole thing. 

And another bonus: Meeks filed his complaint in Illinois state court just two weeks after another whistleblower at the same university was awarded $2.5 million  Read More ›

The Buddhist, The Bible, And Morning Coffee

Did you hear the one about the Buddhist marketing director who refused an order to add Bible verses to the daily morning e-mail he sent to all employees – and then got fired the next day, after an otherwise successful eight-year career?

This is, of course, not an opening line to a joke, but another installment in our occasional series about the intersection of religious beliefs (of all types) and employment – also of all types.  Religion and employment issues – whether it’s an employee in the C-suite or someone further along the hierarchy – almost never mix well.  Just this week, of course, nine of our fellow lawyers who happen to sit on the Supreme Court are hearing arguments in two cases about whether a company with a religious belief about contraception is exempt from the Affordable Care Act’s requirements for employer-provided health insurance. 

Far away from the hallowed marble home of the Supreme Court (which, by the way, we think is in a fine building -- unlike former Justice Harlan Fiske Stone) and down in the Eastern District of Texas, a new suit raises an interesting question of prohibited religious discrimination under Title VII: namely, can a fired Buddhist employee win damages from a company that, he says, fired him after eight years because he refused to put Bible quotations in the daily e-mail his employer had him write and send to all of the company’s 500 employees?  Read More ›

The Inbox, Why Does The Shortest Month Feel So Long Edition

Here at our polar vortex bunker in the freezing Nation’s Capital, supplies are running short and we’re vigorously debating whether we should make a mad dash to the Suits by SuitsMobile and drive straight down to visit our colleagues in Tampa, Florida, or just tough it out and pray/chant/hope that the cold will ultimately break.  In the meantime, we’ve defrosted the following interesting bits of news from the world of executive employment issues: 

E-mailing Work Documents to Your Personal Account Looks Fishy, Says NY ‎Appeals Court in New Non-Compete Opinion

Non-lawyers often wonder why folks in our profession spend so much time and money poring over the documents and e-mails each side usually has to produce in litigation.  Sometimes, these document reviews are the legal equivalent of looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack.

And sometimes, you find the proverbial needle – or needles.  And when you do, and the success or failure of the case turns on that e-mail, or set of e-mails, then the time and money spent on the search for those things turns out to have been a wise and necessary investment. 

Take the case of TBA Global, LLC v. Proscenium Events, LLCTBA is an event planning company that “produces live event programs and marketing presentations for companies and branded products.”  In the course of its work, it hired three senior employees – Santoro, Shearon, and Cavanaugh.  While the exact terms of their agreements differ from each other, all three signed non-compete agreements with TBA that provided that if they ever left the company, they would not “directly or indirectly, communicate with clients or prospective clients” of the company for a period of time (one year for two of the executives, and two years for the other).   Read More ›

Whistleblower or wrongfully terminated employee? California Supreme Court says: ‎whistleblower

There’s often a fine line between being a bona fide whistleblower and being just an angry plaintiff suing for wrongful termination.  The plaintiff’s allegations of whistleblowing conduct can often be very similar to the conduct that gave rise to him or her being fired – setting up something of a Rorschach blot test for the court that is trying to figure out what’s really going on. 

That’s the position doctor Mark Fahlen found himself in.  Doctor Fahlen was fired by his employer, a group of doctors working at a hospital in California.  The doctor said he was fired, in part, because he complained – as a whistleblower – about nurses in the hospital failing to provide adequate care for his patients because they failed to follow his instructions.  The group of doctors fired Fahlen after the hospital revoked his privileges (apparently a necessary part of being a member of the group) because it said Fahlen had angry fights with those same nurses – and, therefore, he was fired because he wasn’t a suitable employee.  So, essentially the same factual allegations could be whistleblowing or a basis for termination.   Read More ›

The Inbox, How Many More Decades Until Spring Edition

Here at the Suits by Suits Worldwide Operations Center, weather continues to have us flummoxed, vexed, and annoyed: even though a famous Pennsylvania rodent discerned that we would have six more weeks of our brutal winter, we’ve had a pleasant warm spell that is about to come to a crushing end due to a storm front that goes by the curious name of "Texas Hooker" (we did not make that up).  And we’re about to be plunged back into the depths of the polar vortex yet again – although our earlier bouts with the grim chill may have wiped out our area’s growing population of stink bugs.   

In any event, we always take shelter from the storms, the cold, and the heat by digging into our Inbox of interesting developments in executive employment disputes and the issues that surround them, including:

The Inbox, Pre-Super Bowl Edition

Here at Suits by Suits Polar Vortex Centre, the debate rages even as the hours tick down to kickoff: who should we root for in Sunday’s big game, the Denver Broncos or the Seattle Seahawks?  Both teams’ home bases, from our point of view, have much to commend them in terms of the executive employment issues we love so much.  Seattle is home to Robinson Cano’s almost-quarter-billion-dollar deal with the Seattle Mariners – maybe not C-suite, but a great employment arrangement in and of itself.  Colorado, on the other hand, has given us some toothy stories over the years: from kidnapping to wrongful termination related to speech and a neat case on national origin discrimination.  

But since our beloved Washington football club was essentially eliminated from contention in about, er, October, none of it has really mattered much to us. 

In any event, before you dig into the chili and chicken wings (or not), here are some of the week’s most interesting happenings that concern executive-employer relationships:

Highland v. Daugherty: Part 2 -- Daugherty Responds

In Part 1 of this post, we looked at a heated executive employment dispute that is being tried in Dallas.  The case involves a former hedge fund executive, sued by his former employer for allegedly not returning 59,000 confidential documents when he resigned and for trying to poach the firm’s clients.  The Dallas Morning News has full coverage here and here

The trial is forcing both sides to air things about the other – and themselves – that they would likely not want raised in a public forum.  In Part 1, for example, we noted how Highland executives testified that a compensation program had to be stopped after the executive, Daugherty, left the firm, because (as the Dallas Morning News put it) Daugherty “engaged in conflict of interest transactions” for the compensation program.  Surely Highland would rather not have raised that issue publicly.  But that’s what aggressive litigation sometimes forces parties to have to do to win their case – which is the cautionary tale of the Highland v. Daugherty trial.   Read More ›