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Showing 4 posts from October 2015.

Boilerplate Terms in Employment Agreements May Trap the Unwary

In many respects, employees with employment agreements seem to have made it to the corporate “Promised Land.”

Through skill and hard work, these employees have distinguished themselves enough to merit individualized attention to the various types of compensation they will receive. However, these agreements may also contain land mines that spring into action when the relationship between the employee and the employer sours. Read More ›

Are You the Vice President in Charge of Going to Jail?

In my last post, I boldly predicted a possible winner—a dark horse if you will—emerging from the new Department of Justice policy announced by Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates and immortalized in the so-called Yates memo.

But this post is less optimistic. Today, I’m talking about the sure loser post-Yates: the upper-middle executive.

Or, as Ms. Yates memorably described to The New York Times, the Vice President in Charge of Going to Jail.

What does the Yates memo do to squeeze the upper-middle executive like never before? Read More ›

The Inbox – Trick-or-Treat?

In the corporate world, the treats offered to executives can be as sweet as stock incentives and cash bonuses. But the tricks can be as sour as individual liability for wrongdoing and salary disgorgement.

NJ Supreme Court Makes It Easier For Employers To Take Back Executive Salaries
Lately, we’ve been discussing the Yates Memo and the alarms it must be sounding in corporate board rooms across the country. In a similar vein, the New Jersey Supreme Court offered little comfort to spooked executives when it recently decided to broaden the remedies available to employers who seek disgorgement of former high-level employees’ salaries. Read More ›

Court Rejects American Apparel Founder’s Bid for Advancement and Indemnification

When a company sues an executive, one question is who will pay the legal bills. As we covered earlier this year, that’s been an issue in Dov Charney’s ongoing legal battle with his former employer, American Apparel. Specifically, after American Apparel sued Charney for violating their standstill agreement by getting involved in shareholder suits and commenting to the press, Charney sued American Apparel in Delaware for indemnification and advancement. He claimed that the suit was brought “by reason of the fact” that he had been CEO, and thus fell within the indemnification provisions in various corporate documents. Read More ›